Marshmallow fruit tart

Some dishes have stories. Evoke memories, recall friends. Christmas 1991: Lesotho. My friend Joan was working there as a volunteer; I was the same in Namibia. I decided to visit. And towards the end of my stay, somebody’s birthday perhaps, perhaps the evening when we decided that the road to wealth & happiness began with establishing a Society for the protection of an endangered bird, real or imagined (though we never followed this path, I hasten to add, for the benefit of those who donate to such charities!), on that evening Joan produced this dessert. Which wowed me then, and every time I make it is guaranteed to produce requests for the recipe. And this was what we finished our Italian-themed meal with the other night. Though, I have to say, using tinned fruit makes it faux summery, and it’s hardly Italian. But, it’s the sort of dessert to appeal to the kid in all of us.

 

Crust

 

In a food processor, turn a packet of Krispie biscuits into rough crumbs … this is why I missed a food processor in that borrowed kitchen … banging the biscuits in a plastic bag with a rolling pin doesn’t achieve the same effect! Melt 125 mg of butter and mix with biscuits. Press the result into a well-greased 22 cm dish, and chill while making filling. But do make sure, when pressing, that the crust’s not thick & chunky in places. We’re trying to make a good impression here, after all!

 

Filling

 

Drain a can of boysenberries (my preference, though other fruits would do just as well), reserving 50 ml of the juice. Put this juice in a small saucepan together with 100 gms of marshmallows (I always use white, because that’s what Joan said, but I can’t see why pink ones aren’t suitable) & slowly heat until the marshmallows are melted. Then remove from the heat & allow to cool … but not to set.

 

Meanwhile, whip 250 ml of cream. When the juice & marshmallow stuff has cooled, fold it into the cream along with the boysenberries (or whatever).  Then turn into the crust, and return to the fridge, allowing to chill until set. I always allow a few hours, just to play it safe.

 

And the result? Yummy, yummy, yummy.

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